Pelvic area pain in men

Finding help for pelvic pain: A patient’s story

Pelvic floor musclesIn the spring of 1996, André James* was under a great deal of stress. Married, with a young family to support, he was finishing his medical training at a big-city hospital and anxiously searching for a job. One day, he suddenly experienced severe testicular pain. It was as if someone grabbed both testicles and kept tightening his grip.

*Editor’s note: To protect his privacy, the patient’s name and some biographical details have been changed. All medical details are as reported. A patient’s physicians are usually not named, per editorial policy, but James requested that some be included in this article, and the physicians agreed.

Frightened, James immediately saw a urologist, who examined him, ran several tests, and declared that he could find nothing wrong. But he noted that he often saw police officers, who were under tremendous stress, with the same symptoms. Stress, the physician said, might have triggered James’ symptoms, but he prescribed an antibiotic just in case one of the tests had failed to detect a bacterial infection. It took two rounds of antibiotics and several weeks’ time, but the pain finally went away. And when James found a job at another hospital, the stress went away, too.

James forgot all about the problem until 2004, when he developed testicular pain again. This time, however, the pain was somewhat different. It moved from one testicle to the other and then migrated above his pubic bone. He urinated frequently, and when he did, he felt as if he were urinating boiling water. His penis hurt, and the pain grew more intense after he had sex. He saw another urologist, who did a complete workup. Once again, the doctor couldn’t find any obvious problems, and the laboratory tests all came back negative. The doctor concluded that James had chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS), a type of prostatitis.Biofeedback equipment One possible cause: excessive tightness in the muscles of the pelvic floor (see Figure 1).

Figure 1: Pelvic floor muscles

Tightness in muscles that compose the pelvic floor can lead to pelvic pain, often called prostatitis, and difficulty urinating. The pink circle represents the prostate, which lies beneath the muscles.

The doctor prescribed lorazepam (Ativan), a drug often used as a muscle relaxant, and anti-inflammatory medications. He also suggested mild exercise, applying heat to the perineum, and sitting in a hot bath. The lorazepam worked best — just 1 milligram a day relieved James’ pain.

Easier Said Than Done
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Helius has cured me sing praises to thee

by yf---

Proctalgia fugax
Proctalgia fugax is a severe, cramp-like pain, deep in the anal canal. It usually
lasts for a few minutes, but can sometimes last for up to half an hour. You may
feel a need to defecate urgently, but nothing happens. It may even make you
feel dizzy, or give you a headache. It occurs in both men and women. The pain
often wakes sufferers at night, and men may have an erection at the same
time

Guys:

by ---

Ok, I'm a guy and I've wondered if any other men have ever tried to "double jack" themselves by holding one of the testicals and tubes tightly upon ejaculation? I tried this and it hurt like hell. The idea was to have the ability to come twice in a short period of time. To have a double orgasm.
It didn't really work out quite that way and resulted in physical pain for the testical that I held as well as the vas deferens tube. I held it very tightly though and pinched the vas deferens so what I think happened is I may have herniated my vas deferens. Does anyone know if this is possible?
I don't think I've ruptured it because there is no blood or signs of infection

Grimm!

by ---

Ok, I'm a guy and I've wondered if any other men have ever tried to "double jack" themselves by holding one of the testicals and tubes tightly upon ejaculation? I tried this and it hurt like hell. The idea was to have the ability to come twice in a short period of time. To have a double orgasm.
It didn't really work out quite that way and resulted in physical pain for the testical that I held as well as the vas deferens tube. I held it very tightly though and pinched the vas deferens so what I think happened is I may have herniated my vas deferens. Does anyone know if this is possible?
I don't think I've ruptured it because there is no blood or signs of infection

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